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Cerro Marta Trail - Omar Torrijos National Park

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The Basics

Trail type: in and out
Round-trip Distance: 20.9 km (13 miles)
Round-trip Duration of course: 6-8 hours
Elevation Gain: 693 m (2,273 ft)
Max Height: 1022 m (3,353 ft)
Attractions: Cloud Forest, view historical element, rural life, rivers, waterfalls, plants and animals
Activities: Hiking, bird watching
Use: Low (tourists) moderate (residents)
Rating: DIFFICULT
Activity requires good physical condition. It applies to roads that could be dangerous in some parts and should be traveled with care. Routes could pass for areas in poor or where there is no marked trail, or when the terrain is very steep and requires some skill to negotiate.

Dificil



The Trailhead

You must have a car with 4x4 to reach the Community of Santa Marta.

From Panama City (East): 17 km after Penonomé, Cocle off the Inter-American Highway to your right is the community of La Candelaria. You will a sign announcing Omar Torrijos National Park. Take the road up to the Community of El Cope (approx. 35 km). Take the first right once in El Cope. Drive for approx. 30 minutes to reach the community of Santa Marta.

From Natá (West): 14 km after Natá on the Interamerican Highway is the community of La Cadelaria. Turn left and take the road up to the Community of El Cope (approx. 35 km). Take the first right once in El Cope. Drive for approx. 30 minutes to reach the community of Santa Marta.

The Trail

The trailhead begins in the community of Santa Marta. Almost half of the trail is a living trail used by people living in Santa Marta or nearby communities. There are several orange groves and cattle pastures before reaching the park borders. In several instances you will cross the River Tigrero. There are no bridges but the water level is fairly low.
Once in the park you will begin a steep climb up a trail through the cloud forest. There are rest areas and bridges to cross streams. When you get near the top you see the remains of the plane in which the General Omar Torrijos died. You can than take the trail up to the top of the cerro. At the top there may be high winds, but on clear days you can see both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Located approximately 45 minutes from the start of the trailhead is the Tigrero Waterfall. We recommend visiting the waterfall on the way back. It is very refreshing.

Seasonal Elements
Dry Season: Wind in the top
Rainy Season: Path s slippery in sections, rivers may be high after rains

Links related to General Omar Torrijos:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/600160/Omar-Torrijos
http://www.biography.com/people/omar-torrijos-39262
http://www.ecured.cu/index.php/Muerte_de_Omar_Torrijos 

Facilities

Benches to rest upon reaching wooded area.

The Tips

Use a local guide that lives in the community. This way you probably won’t get lost AND you will support the local economy.

What to Bring:
  • Enough Water
  • Enough Food
  • Shoes with good soles or Hiking boots (do not wear flip-flops)
  • Rain jacket (rainy season)
  • Repellent (optional)
  • Hiking Poles (optional)
  • Head lamp
  • Hiking First Aid Kit

The Hours, Fees, Local Guides

Management: National Government & Local Community (Autoridad Nacional del Ambiente - Santa Marta Community)

Hours: N/A but recommend you start your hike early

Fees: Guide’s rate

Contact Information:

Parque Nacional Omar Torrijos Administration: (507) 997-9077

Regional ANAM Administration office en Coclé - (507) 997-9805 / (507) 997-7538

National Protected Areas Department: (507) 500-0855 / (507) 500-0839

Local Guides:Macedonio Perez 6549-7321 (Spanish Only)

Additional Information:
http://www.anam.gob.pa/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=321&Itemid=322&lang=en

Disclaimer - Caminando Panama is a personal project, a nonprofit website. The contents are based on personal contributions from the authors and /or of partners and general public. No rights can be derived from the information and images that are shown. The data in this website is informational only, may contain errors, or be slightly out of date.Caminando Panama is not responsible in any way for accidents and losses caused by people during walks or hikes. Each walker is responsible for their actions and consequences.